TEMPLATE Letter for Members to Use to Submit Responses to ERO Posting on Growth Plan February 13, 2019
The government has submitted a proposal to make Modifications to O. Reg. 311/06 (Transitional Matters - Growth Plans) made under the Places to Grow Act, 2005 to implement the Proposed Amendment to the Growth Plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe, 2017. OSSGA has made the point to the government that the current policy framework is not working. Approvals for new mineral aggregate operations in Southern Ontario are taking up to 10 years to complete the process. There are too many overlapping policies and inconsistent approaches between the Provincial Plans, Regional Official Plans, Local Official Plans and Conservation Authority policies regarding the management of this essential non-renewable resource.
Specification Alert February 6, 2019
Please be advised that there have been changes made to Aggregate Specifications for OPSS 1002, April 2018. This revised specification has been included in several MTO tender documents recently, most notably MTO Contract #2018-2024, Hwy 400 & Hwy 89 Interchange, Closing Feb. 14, 2019 and has raised concerns with many suppliers.
Avenues Winter 2019 Issue Now Available! February 5, 2019
The newest Winter 2019 issue of Avenues Magazine is now available online!
2019 Active & Associate Member Applications Are Now Available! February 1, 2019
2019 Active & Associate Member Applications to the Ontario Stone, Sand & Gravel Association are now available. Visit ossga.com/why_join_ossga to apply!
Securing Access to Stone, Sand & Gravel: OSSGA's Recommendations for Securing Close-to-Market Aggregate January 30, 2019
Ensuring Economic Growth and Future Greenspace in the Greater Golden Horseshoe
Revised Sample Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Now Available for OSSGA Members January 18, 2019
Under the Federal Government's amended WHMIS legislation, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) have been renamed Safety Data Sheets (SDS).

The world is running out of sand — and you’d be surprised how significant that is

September 11, 2017 at 2:10 PM

From the Financial Post

China has devoured more sand in the past four years than the United States did throughout the 20th century. Dubai, a city built on a desert, had to import the sand used in the world’s tallest tower, the Burj Khalifa, from Australia. In India, sand has become such a hot commodity that it has been taken over by “sand mafias” who illegally mine and sell it on the black market.

The demand for sand is on the rise as urban development around the world soars and hydraulic fracturing technology becomes more popular in places such as the U.S. and Alberta.

Though most people have never thought twice about the supply of the seemingly plentiful grains, a growing number of observers are ringing the alarm that the global supply of sand is slipping through our fingers.

Read the article in the Financial Post.